Amy SallAmy Sall reflects on her Senegalese heritage and how its physical reminders shepherd her sense of home—wherever she may be.

Amy SallAmy Sall reflects on her Senegalese heritage and how its physical reminders shepherd her sense of home—wherever she may be.

“I think it’s important that your home makes you feel good because it’s your safe space—it’s your sanctuary”

Decorating the sun-dappled New York City apartment of editor Amy Sall is a collection of books on African history and a poster of the film Moolaadé by Senegalese filmmaker Ousmane Sembène. “I give myself the right to explore anything I find interesting,” Amy says. Among her social media feeds is archival and documentary imagery from Africa and the diaspora from the colonial period to the present: Grainy black-and-white footage of a 1961 meeting of the Nation of Islam appears among photos of the West African earth architecture of Mali and snapshots of Haitian street culture. Its appeal is filtered into the pages of her forthcoming journal, SUNU: Journal of African Affairs, Critical Thought + Aesthetics.

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