Primary FocusA colorful art history of red, blue and yellow.

Primary FocusA colorful art history of red, blue and yellow.

Issue 25

,

Arts & Culture

Primary colors can be combined in different ways to produce every other color. Embedded in their absolute simplicity, then, is a latent complexity—a potential for extrapolation and manipulation.

Take, for example, the art of Alexander Rodchenko. In 1921, the pioneering Russian artist joined four of his constructivist movement compatriots in an exhibition in Moscow. Rodchenko was bold, as always, and his contribution to the show was a triptych: Pure Red Color, Pure Yellow Color and Pure Blue Color. The three canvases—each covered in a primary pigment—were modern art’s first non-figurative monochromes. He didn’t describe his work as an homage to painting, or frame it as the concentrated essence of all color and thus a celebration of the art form’s material genesis. Instead, Ro...

The full version of this story is only available for subscribers

Want to enjoy full access? Subscribe Now

Subscribe Discover unlimited access to Kinfolk

  • Four print issues of Kinfolk magazine per year, delivered to your door, with twelve-months’ access to the entire Kinfolk.com archive and all web exclusives.

  • Receive twelve-months of all access to the entire Kinfolk.com archive and all web exclusives.

Learn More

Already a Subscriber? Login

Your cart is empty

Your Cart (0)