Correction: Gratitude JournalsOn the downside of only seeing the good side.

Correction: Gratitude JournalsOn the downside of only seeing the good side.

  • Words Precious Adesina
  • Photograph Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen

For those who live on the internet, it has been difficult to avoid the recent onslaught of hyper-positivity. In early 2023, this came in the form of “lucky girl syndrome” on TikTok—the idea that if you repeatedly tell the universe how fortunate you are, you will be. 

Adopting various techniques to have a more optimistic outlook is nothing new. Perhaps the best-known analogue equivalent is the gratitude journal, in which a practitioner dedicates a certain amount of time each day or week to listing how they are fortunate. The premise is that by regularly thinking about the ways in which your life is good, the reasons why it is not quite ideal will feel less potent. Studies have shown a range of benefits to the habit, including better sleep, stronger resilience, a reduction in the s...

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