Delayed Gratification In partnership with Fritz Hansen, Kinfolk unearths the long history of a new classic.

Delayed Gratification In partnership with Fritz Hansen, Kinfolk unearths the long history of a new classic.

Issue 48

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Design, Partnerships

  • Words George Upton
  • Photograph Ville Varumo

Design schools are much more than just a place to learn a trade. For young designers, particularly those coming of age at times of great change, they are often the site of bold innovations that will go on to define a new generation’s aesthetic tastes. 

For Danish designer Poul Kjærholm, the three years he spent at the School of Arts and Crafts in Copenhagen were transformative. By the end of 1952—the year he graduated—he had already designed four pieces that marked him out as one of Denmark’s most important mid-century designers, despite being only in his early 20s. One of these—the PK4 chair—has recently been reissued by the Danish design house Fritz Hansen.

Developed as a simplified version of Kjærholm’s graduation project, the PK4 demonstrates the idiosyncratic appro...

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