Everything and NothingIt was Isaac Newton who suggested that black was not a color. History suggests otherwise.

Everything and NothingIt was Isaac Newton who suggested that black was not a color. History suggests otherwise.

Issue 26

,

Arts & Culture

True black has no hue; it represents the complete absence or absorption of color. It is, to human eyes, the most common thing in the universe, and we have made it a color all its own.

Nothing is older than black in mythological and religious lore. To scientists, it was there, alone, in the incomprehensible non-being that preceded the Big Bang. The primordial Greek deities Nyx (night) and Erebus (darkness) were preceded only by Chaos. The Hindu goddess Kali, worshipped as the “mother of the universe,” takes her name from the Sanskrit word for black. The Abrahamic religions also gave darkness its due. “Let there be light,” said the Lord in the Old Testament, and the primal void was illuminated: “And the light shineth in darkness, and the darkness comprehended it not.”

Black has...

The full version of this story is only available for subscribers

Want to enjoy full access? Subscribe Now

Subscribe Discover unlimited access to Kinfolk

  • Four print issues of Kinfolk magazine per year, delivered to your door, with twelve-months’ access to the entire Kinfolk.com archive and all web exclusives.

  • Receive twelve-months of all access to the entire Kinfolk.com archive and all web exclusives.

Learn More

Already a Subscriber? Login

Your cart is empty

Your Cart (0)