The Evolution Of MatchmakingFor Better or Worse? Harriet Fitch Little investigates why offline matchmaking businesses are thriving.

The Evolution Of MatchmakingFor Better or Worse? Harriet Fitch Little investigates why offline matchmaking businesses are thriving.

New York matchmaker Amy Van Doran looks like fashion designer Edna Mode from The Incredibles, only she’s a few decades younger and her bobbed hair is not black but bright orange. Working out of a storefront in the East Village, Van Doran’s job is to find love for a client list made up exclusively of women—most in their 40s—who each pay upwards of $15,000 for an entry in her vintage Rolodex.

It sounds like a stereotype 40 years out of date. And yet Van Doran is in high demand. More than that, she’s considered cool. “When I first started out, matchmaking was something people were a little embarrassed about,” she says. “Now I’m being invited to weddings, and people are telling their friends they’re working with me.”

Van Doran is walking through the East Village wh...

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